209 Times, Stockton, and The Future Of Local News : Invisibilia Is 209 Times helping or hurting the community it claims to serve? What does the site mean for the future of local news in America? And what can be done about it? In the final installment of "The Chaos Machine" series , Yowei finds herself in the middle of a long-standing tug of war over who owns the truth.

The Chaos Machine: A Looping Revolt

The Chaos Machine: A Looping Revolt

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In Stockton, there are competing narratives: the 209 Times camp believes the city establishment and its institutions have failed the people. The other side insists they are battling a dangerous source of misinformation that makes it harder for them to serve their city. In the final installment of "The Chaos Machine" series, co-host Yowei Shaw talks to Stockton community members and experts to try to understand if 209 Times is helping or hurting the community. And what its success means about the future of local news in America.

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