Why Is Everyone Talking About Newsletters? : 1A In the last ten years, it seems like newsletters have replaced blogs as the platform du jour.

And Substack helps writers profit off their own work. But the platform's success isn't without controversy.

The main criticism being who they allow on the platform.We dig into newsletters and what they mean for our media landscape.

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1A

Why Is Everyone Talking About Newsletters?

Why Is Everyone Talking About Newsletters?

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The picture shows an employee typing on a computer keyboard at the headquarters of Internet security giant Kaspersky in Moscow. KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images

The picture shows an employee typing on a computer keyboard at the headquarters of Internet security giant Kaspersky in Moscow.

KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images

Ten years ago it seemed everyone had a blog. Now? They have a newsletter.

The platform Substack is making it easier than ever for writers to make a profit from their work.

The success isn't without controversy. The company has been criticized for who they allow on the platform.

What's the big deal with newsletters anyway? And what does this all mean for our media landscape?

Daniel Lavery, Darian Harvin and Anne Friedmanjoin us for the conversation.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.