How To Persuade People To Take Covid-19 Vaccine : The Indicator from Planet Money What's the best way to persuade people to get a vaccine? A new study from the University of Pennsylvania may have the answer.
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How Do You Get People To Get A Vaccine?

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How Do You Get People To Get A Vaccine?

How Do You Get People To Get A Vaccine?

How Do You Get People To Get A Vaccine?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/996675144/996679009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Sirachai Arunrugstichai/Getty Images
(Sirachai Arunrugstichai/Getty Images)
Sirachai Arunrugstichai/Getty Images

Free beer, a free car ride, free cocktails: companies and governments have been trying all kinds of things to try and encourage people to get the Covid-19 vaccine. Some are even using just cash: West Virginia is offering young residents 100 dollar savings bonds if they'll get their shots.

These are cool perks, but what really moves the needle in terms of vaccine uptake? Katy Milkman, a professor of operations, information and decisions at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, ran a huge study on figuring out what kind of messaging would be most effective on vaccination.

Katy's team got together with WalMart, Northeast Penn Medicine and Geisinger health to reach out to more than 700,000 patients. They used text messages to test out different kinds of messaging and incentives and see how effective they were at getting people to go and get their flu shot. On The Indicator from Planet Money, we figure out the best way to convince someone to get a vaccine.