California Highway Patrol Investigates Sexual Misconduct : On Our Watch One officer in Los Angeles used car inspections to hit on women. In the San Francisco Bay Area, another woman says an officer used police resources to harass and stalk her. The California Highway Patrol quietly fired both of them for sexual harassment, but never looked into whether their misconduct was criminal. The second episode of On Our Watch examines the system of accountability for officers who abuse their power for sex and exposes where that system falls short.
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Conduct Unbecoming

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Conduct Unbecoming

Conduct Unbecoming

Conduct Unbecoming

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Nicole Xu for NPR
Artwork by Nicole Xu.
Nicole Xu for NPR

One officer in Los Angeles used car inspections to hit on women. Three hundred miles away in the San Francisco Bay Area, another woman says an officer used police resources to harass and stalk her.

The second episode of On Our Watch investigates these two cases of sexual misconduct by California Highway Patrol officers. While the officers were fired, the agency did not refer potential crimes to prosecutors. And the files show some women who came forward were met with suspicion, discouragement or what one woman saw as intimidation.

How do departments treat victims who come forward and deal with officers who cross the line? Why hasn't the #MeToo movement reached policing?

Learn more about On Our Watch at KQED.org. This podcast is produced as part of the California Reporting Project, a coalition of news organizations in California.