Disability In Science Labs And STEMM Fields : Short Wave Scientists and students with disabilities are often excluded from laboratories — in part because of how they're designed. Emily Kwong speaks to disabled scientist Krystal Vasquez on how her disability changed her relationship to science, how scientific research can become more accessible, and how STEMM fields need to change to be more welcoming to disabled scientists.

Read Krystal's article in Chemistry World, 'Excluded From The Lab.'

You can email Short Wave at ShortWave@npr.org.

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

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Professor with muscular dystrophy working with engineering students setting up adjustable stage at chemical analysis instrument in a laboratory Getty Images/DisabilityImages hide caption

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Getty Images/DisabilityImages

Professor with muscular dystrophy working with engineering students setting up adjustable stage at chemical analysis instrument in a laboratory

Getty Images/DisabilityImages

Scientists and students with disabilities are often excluded from laboratories — in part because of how they're designed. Emily Kwong speaks to disabled scientist Krystal Vasquez on how her disability changed her relationship to science, how scientific research can become more accessible, and how STEMM fields need to change to be more welcoming to disabled scientists.

Read Krystal's article in Chemistry World, 'Excluded From The Lab.'

You can email Short Wave at ShortWave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Rasha Aridi.