Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats : Alt.Latino The documentary film Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba captures the development of a new music style in Santiago de Cuba.
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Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

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Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

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A young boy from the dance group Sangre Nueva shows off his moves in La Maya, Santiago de Cuba. Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist

A young boy from the dance group Sangre Nueva shows off his moves in La Maya, Santiago de Cuba.

Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist

Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi jumps on new sounds as they emerge. He's documented the Cuban rap movement (2005's Inventos: Hip-Hop) and the fusion between highlife and hip-hop (2008's Homegrown: HipLife in Ghana). So when he noticed a new style that mixed Cuban music, hip-hop, a hint of reggaeton and Afrobeats, Eli recalls telling his brother Kahil, "Yo, let's go down there and document this genre being born."

Bakosó: Afrobeats of Cuba is the thrilling result. On this week's show, the brothers share what went into making the movie, but also lots of great dance music.


DJ Jigüe, "Cuarentena Mix"

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Ozkaro

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El Inka

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Maikel El Padrino

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