How COVID-19 Is Changing Celebrity Culture : 1A The pandemic has shaken our relationships with celebrities. From the backlash to the "Imagine" video to the Kardashians private island getaway, the tide has been seemingly turning against the rich and famous.

Ellen compared her mansion to jail and Madonna called COVID-19 the great equalizer from her rose-petaled bathtub. Is it the end of an era for celebrities as we know them? And how is the internet changing the way we think about fame?

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How COVID-19 Is Changing Celebrity Culture

How COVID-19 Is Changing Celebrity Culture

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In this handout photo provided by Ellen DeGeneres, host Ellen DeGeneres poses for a selfie taken by Bradley Cooper with (clockwise from L-R) Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Channing Tatum, Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Peter Nyong'o Jr. and Bradley Cooper during the 86th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California. Handout/Ellen DeGeneres/Twitter via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Ellen DeGeneres/Twitter via Getty Images

In this handout photo provided by Ellen DeGeneres, host Ellen DeGeneres poses for a selfie taken by Bradley Cooper with (clockwise from L-R) Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Channing Tatum, Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Peter Nyong'o Jr. and Bradley Cooper during the 86th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California.

Handout/Ellen DeGeneres/Twitter via Getty Images

It's been over a year since that infamous "Imagine" video hit our timelines.

It featured actor Gal Gadot and a dozen or so of her A-lister friends singing into their phones as a gesture of togetherness at the beginning of the pandemic.

The intention was good but the gesture was empty. It wasn't connected to raising money for charity or to any kind of pandemic aid. And that's part of why it backfired for many social media users.

Online celebrity blunders have quickly become a pandemic-era staple. From the Kardashians escaping on a private island getaway, to Ellen comparing her mansion to jail, to Madonna calling COVID the "great equalizer" in her rose-petaled bathtub.

We're honing in on the internet and celebrity. How has our conception of fame changed in the pandemic? And in the age of the internet?

Co-hosts of the podcast "Who? Weekly" Lindsey Weber and Bobby Finger join us for the conversation as well as the anonymous creator behind the "deuxmoi" celebrity gossip Instagram account.