How Old Fossils Of Fish Bones Are Revealing New Secrets Of Evolution. : Short Wave Paleontologist Yara Haridy looks at fossilized bones for a living. When she randomly walked by a scientific poster one day, she discovered an entirely new way to take pictures of her fossils. The results are shedding new light on how bones evolved.
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Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

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Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

Taking A New Look At Some Old Bones

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Paleontologist Yara Haridy studies fossils that range from 10,000 years old to 480 million years old. Yara Haridy hide caption

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Yara Haridy

Paleontologist Yara Haridy studies fossils that range from 10,000 years old to 480 million years old.

Yara Haridy

Paleontologist Yara Haridy looks at fossilized bones for a living. When she randomly walked by a scientific poster one day, she discovered an entirely new way to take detailed images of her fossils. The results are shedding new light on how bones evolved.

This episode was produced by Rasha Aridi, edited by Geoff Brumfiel and Viet Le, and fact-checked by Tyler Jones. Josh Newell was the audio engineer.