Heroic Rat Hangs Up His Sniffer After Years Of Detecting Land Mines A rat named Magawa has been working for five years in Cambodia, sniffing out dozens of land mines. He is believed to have saved lives. The animal is about to embark on a well-deserved retirement.

Heroic Rat Hangs Up His Sniffer After Years Of Detecting Land Mines

Heroic Rat Hangs Up His Sniffer After Years Of Detecting Land Mines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1003872841/1003872842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rat named Magawa has been working for five years in Cambodia, sniffing out dozens of land mines. He is believed to have saved lives. The animal is about to embark on a well-deserved retirement.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Leila Fadel with this update to a story we brought you last year. Magawa, quite possibly the world's most decorated mine-sniffing rat, is retiring. Over his five-year career, the African giant pouched rat used his super schnoz to sniff out 71 landmines in Cambodia. But recently, Magawa started slowing down, and his handlers think he deserves some rest. May you smell nothing more but your favorite watermelon snacks from now on. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2021 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.