Cyberattackers Target Companies, Demand Millions In Ransom : Consider This from NPR Cyberattackers have recently targeted a crucial fuel pipeline, a global meat distributor and a water treatment plant. The Biden administration likens the surge in cyberattacks to terrorism — and says they plan to treat it like a national security threat. NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre details the administration's plans.

When businesses are targeted by ransomware, someone like Bill Siegel steps in to help companies figure out if they have any options but to pay up. Siegel runs Coveware, a company that responds to ransomware attacks and often negotiates with hackers. He spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment
that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.


Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

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How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

How The Biden Administration Is Confronting A Surge In Cyberattacks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1003972313/1004092014" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An out of service bag covers a pump handle at a gas station May 12 in Fayetteville, N.C., following the Colonial Pipeline hack. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

An out of service bag covers a pump handle at a gas station May 12 in Fayetteville, N.C., following the Colonial Pipeline hack.

Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Cyberattackers have recently targeted a crucial fuel pipeline, a global meat distributor and a water treatment plant. The Biden administration likens the surge in cyberattacks to terrorism — and says they plan to treat it like a national security threat. NPR National Security Correspondent Greg Myre details the administration's plans.

When businesses are targeted by ransomware, someone like Bill Siegel steps in to help companies figure out if they have any options but to pay up. Siegel runs Coveware, a company that responds to ransomware attacks and often negotiates with hackers. He spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment
that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.


Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, Brianna Scott and Lee Hale. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Wynne Davis and Andrew Sussman. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.