Harris Tells Guatemalans, 'Don't Come,' Don't Migrate To The U.S. Vice President Harris was in Guatemala on Monday. Next she meets with Mexico's president — on the second leg of her trip to try to address the root cause of Central American migration to the U.S.

Harris Tells Guatemalans, 'Don't Come,' Don't Migrate To The U.S.

Harris Tells Guatemalans, 'Don't Come,' Don't Migrate To The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004269930/1004269931" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vice President Harris was in Guatemala on Monday. Next she meets with Mexico's president — on the second leg of her trip to try to address the root cause of Central American migration to the U.S.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Vice President Kamala Harris is in Mexico City this morning to meet with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. This is the second leg of her trip to try to address the root causes of Central American migration to the U.S. Vice President Harris had a blunt message yesterday in Guatemala for people who may be thinking about making the trek to try to enter the U.S. as migrants.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

VICE PRESIDENT KAMALA HARRIS: Do not come. Do not come. The United States will continue to enforce our laws and secure our border.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Biden administration says it wants to stop migration by addressing poverty, violence and political corruption in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Jeffrey Davidow says it's important that the Biden administration sends a strong signal to the region.

JEFFREY DAVIDOW: The double message - first she's saying to potential migrants, don't come. Secondly, she's saying, we understand why migrants want to leave their home countries. There are many factors. But in Guatemala specifically, she talked about the inefficiency of government because of endemic corruption.

MARTIN: The Biden administration wants Mexico to be part of a strategy to stop migration flows to the U.S. at their source and cooperate in the economic development in Central America, which they argue would incentivize people to stay in their home countries.

DAVIDOW: Lopez Obrador has indicated both to Trump and to President Biden that he's willing to work cooperatively on migration issues.

FADEL: Republican lawmakers are criticizing the Biden administration for focusing first on Central America and not on the current situation at the U.S. border with Mexico. And Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said the U.S. needs to recognize that decades of intervention in Latin America is in part responsible for the instability that's forced people to flee.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRIOSENCE'S "OUT OF REACH")

Copyright © 2021 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.