Panel Questions Siri, MD

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Siri, MD

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Dulce, according to The Wall Street Journal, now that Apple has given us phones and computers and watches and headphones, they're working on giving us what?

DULCE SLOAN: A break.

SAGAL: I wish, but no.

SLOAN: I know I saw this. Can I have a clue?

SAGAL: Yeah, it's weird 'cause we thought an apple a day keeps these away.

SLOAN: Apple doctors?

SAGAL: Yes, Apple health care.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Say hello to the Unaffordable - but it's so shiny you buy it anyway - Care Act. The idea is that your health is already constantly monitored by your Apple Watch, so instead of you waiting till you get sick to see your boring old android doctor, a spiffy Apple doctor calls you up and expresses surprise you are able to answer the phone given what they know about your cholesterol.

LUKE BURBANK: I paid extra for a feature on my Apple Watch - this is not a joke - or at least I put the setting on, so if I fall over, like during a run, it will call 911. That is a setting on this watch.

FAITH SALIE: Luke, that is such an old man thing to do.

BURBANK: Well, you know, it was an extra five bucks a month or whatever. I sprung for it.

SLOAN: You put a Life Alert on your Apple Watch.

BURBANK: Yes.

SALIE: Exactly. Listen; do you set that when you get into your walk-in tub?

BURBANK: (Laughter) I really have that on my watch. And it really is something that gives me a certain amount of comfort.

SAGAL: The problem is that when you use your lift chair in the stairway, you don't get credit for the steps. Am I right, Luke?

BURBANK: No, that is one of the downsides of the system.

SAGAL: Anyway...

SALIE: My vital organ would come, and I would never remember my password.

SAGAL: (Laughter) That's another problem, yes. Can you imagine having to show your face to a lung so it starts working?

BURBANK: Can I tell you that the face ID on my iPhone stopped recognizing me this week? And I know we've all changed during the pandemic, but that was...

SAGAL: That's a blow.

BURBANK: The phone was telling me, we no longer recognize you, Mr. Burbank.

SAGAL: You know what would be even worse? If you looked into your phone to turn it on and it said, oh, I'm calling Apple health care.

BURBANK: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF BLONDIE SONG, "CALL ME")

SAGAL: Coming up, we cause an international incident in our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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