Maria Hinojosa And Maria Garcia, On Race, Light-Skinned Privilege And Latinidad : Code Switch Maria Garcia and Maria Hinojosa are both Mexican American, both mestiza, and both relatively light-skinned. But Maria Hinojosa strongly identifies as a woman of color, whereas Maria Garcia has stopped doing so. So in this episode, we're asking: How did they arrive at such different places?

What Does It Mean To Be Latino? The 'Light-Skinned Privilege' Edition

What Does It Mean To Be Latino? The 'Light-Skinned Privilege' Edition

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Maria Hinojosa (left) and Maria Garcia. Krystal Quiles for NPR hide caption

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Krystal Quiles for NPR

Maria Hinojosa (left) and Maria Garcia.

Krystal Quiles for NPR

Maria Garcia and Maria Hinojosa are both Mexican American, both mestiza, and both relatively light-skinned. But Maria Hinojosa strongly identifies as a woman of color, whereas Maria Garcia has stopped doing so. So in this episode, we're asking: How did they arrive at such different places? To find out, listen to our latest installment in this series about what it means to be Latino.

In this episode, we reference Maria Hinojosa's memoir, Once I Was You, A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America. We also talk about Maria Garcia's podcast, "Anything For Selena." You can learn more about them here and here.

As we mentioned on the episode, we'd love for you to fill out NPR's short, anonymous podcast survey to let us know your thoughts about our show. You can find the link here. Thanks for helping us out!