COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology : Short Wave Health Correspondent Allison Aubrey updates us on the Biden Administration's goal to have 70 percent of U.S. adults vaccinated by the July 4. Plus, as vaccine makers plan for the possibility that COVID-19 vaccine boosters will be needed, they're pushing ahead with research into new-generation flu shots and mRNA cancer vaccines.

Questions? Existential dread? Optimism? We'd love to hear it — write us at shortwave@npr.org.

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

COVID-19 Vaccines, Boosters And The Renaissance In Vaccine Technology

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U.S. President Joe Biden (left) speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (right) listens during an event in the South Court Auditorium of the White House. President Biden spoke on the COVID-19 response and the vaccination program announcing new incentives including free beer, free childcare and free sports tickets to push Americans to get vaccinated before July 4th. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

U.S. President Joe Biden (left) speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (right) listens during an event in the South Court Auditorium of the White House. President Biden spoke on the COVID-19 response and the vaccination program announcing new incentives including free beer, free childcare and free sports tickets to push Americans to get vaccinated before July 4th.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Health Correspondent Allison Aubrey updates us on the Biden Administration's goal to have 70 percet of U.S. adults vaccinated by the July 4. Plus, as vaccine makers plan for the possibility that COVID vaccine boosters will be needed, they're pushing ahead with research into new-generation flu shots and mRNA cancer vaccines.

Questions? Existential dread? Optimism? We'd love to hear it — write us at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was edited by Joe Neel and Gisele Grayson, produced by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Indi Khera. The audio engineers were Dennis Nielsen, Josh Newell and Leo del Aguila.