Closure Disrupts Life Of Border Town Residents : The Indicator from Planet Money Sixteen months have passed since the closure of the US-Canada border. What are the economic impacts on border towns, local residents, businesses and cross border tourism?

The Line Americans And Canadians Can't Cross

The Line Americans And Canadians Can’t Cross

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Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images
(Photo by Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images)
Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

The closure of the US-Canada border hit Canada's tourism industry hard. Businesses in border towns were hit even harder. As talks of reopening the border take place, we want to know what the border closure did to our Canadian friends - and to us.

Abe Taqtaq's family owns a duty-free store in Windsor, a border town next to Detroit. Business has been slow for Abe and his wish to reopen the borders represents many residents in border towns. Daily life has been severely disrupted, as the reopening schedule looks uncertain.

Economist Ambarish Chandra studies the economics of cross border travel. He says the tourism industry is being affected on both sides of the border. He says, at the current rate, this summer will just be like last year's, with little cross border interactions. For the time being, all people in Windsor and other border towns can do is to wait for July 21, when the debate comes up again of whether to reopen. .

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