The Climate Crisis Is A Public Health Crisis : Short Wave A recent study published in Nature found that 37 percent of heat-related deaths are due to climate change. Dr. Renee Salas is seeing this in the emergency room of Massachusetts General Hospital. She's treating more and more patients for heat-related illnesses like heat stroke and intensified allergies. Today, she gives us a view into her work at the intersection of human health and climate change; plus, she envisions a new health care system that takes climate change into account.

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The Climate Crisis Is A Public Health Crisis

The Climate Crisis Is A Public Health Crisis

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A paramedic with Falck Northwest ambulances treats a man experiencing heat exposure during a heat wave in Salem, Ore. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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Nathan Howard/AP

A recent study published in Nature found that 37 percent of heat-related deaths are due to climate change. Dr. Renee Salas is seeing this in the emergency room of Massachusetts General Hospital. She's treating more and more patients for heat-related illnesses like heat stroke and intensifying allergies. Today, she gives us a view into her work at the intersection of human health and climate change; plus, she envisions a new health care system that takes climate change into account.

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Reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Indi Khera. Josh Newell was the audio engineer.