2 Colleagues Save 2 Lives By Donating Their Kidneys The husbands of Susan Ellis and Tia Wimbush needed kidney transplants, but neither woman could donate. When talking about their blood types, they realized they each matched with the other's husband.

2 Colleagues Save 2 Lives By Donating Their Kidneys

2 Colleagues Save 2 Lives By Donating Their Kidneys

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The husbands of Susan Ellis and Tia Wimbush needed kidney transplants, but neither woman could donate. When talking about their blood types, they realized they each matched with the other's husband.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Two colleagues start talking while washing their hands in the bathroom at work. Months later, they have saved two lives. Backtracking here - Tia Wimbush and Susan Ellis' husbands needed kidney transplants, and neither could donate. So one day, Tia asked Susan what her blood type was. They realized they each matched with the other's husband. After getting tested, they committed to donate. In March, both transplants were successful, and everyone is healthy. It's MORNING EDITION.

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