Teens Ask, We Answer: What's Up With COVID Vaccines? : Short Wave People between the ages of 12 and 17 are now eligible to get the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and health officials expect this age group will soon be able to receive the Moderna one. So, health reporter Pien Huang and Short Wave producer Rebecca Ramirez talked to teens about their questions about the vaccine and what a strange year the pandemic has been for them.

Do you have questions about the coronavirus and the pandemic? Email shortwave@npr.org.

Teens Ask, We Answer: What's Up With COVID Vaccines?

Teens Ask, We Answer: What's Up With COVID Vaccines?

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A teenager receives the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in New Jersey on Monday, April 19, 2021. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

A teenager receives the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in New Jersey on Monday, April 19, 2021.

Seth Wenig/AP

People between the ages of 12 and 17 are now eligible to get the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and health officials expect this age group will soon be able to receive the Moderna one. So, health reporter Pien Huang and Short Wave producer Rebecca Ramirez talked to teens about their questions about the vaccine and what a strange year the pandemic has been for them.

Many thanks to Patricia Bravo and the team at the Latin American Youth Center for hosting us. If you're teenager with questions about coronavirus vaccines, email us at vaccineq@npr.org or leave us a voicemail at 202-513-2590! We'd love to hear from you!

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Gisele Grayson and fact-checked by Indi Khera. Peter Ellena was the audio engineer.