How Cuba's Government Is Attempting To Silence Unprecedented Protests : Consider This from NPR The protests that erupted in Cuba over the weekend are the biggest the country has seen in decades. Cubans are suffering through a summer of shortages, from food and electricity to medicine. All of which have been made worse by the pandemic. Officials in the authoritarian government are tying to stamp out the unrest quickly.

These demonstrations present a political opportunity for President Biden. NPR's Franco Ordonez reports on how the White House's response could change future Florida votes.

NPR international correspondent Carrie Kahn looks into internet blackouts enacted by the Cuban government in an attempt to stop organizing happening on social media platforms.

And Miami-Herald editorial writer Luisa Yanez explains why a younger generation of Cubans may not buckle under pressure.

How Cuba's Government Is Attempting To Silence Unprecedented Protests

How Cuba's Government Is Attempting To Silence Unprecedented Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1014785949/1016601024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A truck of special forces police sits parked outside National Capitol building in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday, July 14, 2021, days after protests. Demonstrators voiced grievances on Sunday against goods shortages, rising prices and power cuts, and some called for a change of government. Eliana Aponte/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eliana Aponte/AP

A truck of special forces police sits parked outside National Capitol building in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday, July 14, 2021, days after protests. Demonstrators voiced grievances on Sunday against goods shortages, rising prices and power cuts, and some called for a change of government.

Eliana Aponte/AP

The protests that erupted in Cuba over the weekend are the biggest the country has seen in decades. Cubans are suffering through a summer of shortages, from food and electricity to medicine. All of which have been made worse by the pandemic. Officials in the authoritarian government are tying to stamp out the unrest quickly.

These demonstrations present a political opportunity for President Biden. NPR's Franco Ordonez reports on how the White House's response could change future Florida votes.

NPR international correspondent Carrie Kahn looks into internet blackouts enacted by the Cuban government in an attempt to stop organizing happening on social media platforms.

And Miami-Herald editorial writer Luisa Yanez explains why a younger generation of Cubans may not buckle under pressure.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Alejandra Marquez, Brianna Scott, and Lee Hale. It was edited by Sami Yenigun and Brent Baughman with help from Arnie Seipel and Mark Katkov. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo. Additional reporting from Vanessa Romo.