A Case Of Police Brutality That Didn't Go Viral : Code Switch We talk a lot on this show about people who have been killed by police officers. But there is so much police violence that falls short of being fatal, but forever alters the lives of the people on the business end of it. So this week, we're turning things over to the "On Our Watch" podcast, out of KQED and NPR's Investigations Team.

Violence That Doesn't Go Viral

Violence That Doesn't Go Viral

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Nicole Xu for NPR
A teenager walks out of a store as a looming blue shape raises his hand behind him.
Nicole Xu for NPR

We've talked a lot on this show about people — usually Black people — who have been killed by police officers. Trying to give context to these deaths is one of the grimmest and most consistent parts of our reporting.

But of course, there is so much police violence that falls short of being fatal, but still forever alters the lives of the people on the business end of it. Killings are just the tip of the iceberg. Injuries, property damage, harassment, legal and hospital bills — that's what more of police misconduct looks like. And that kind of misconduct rarely makes national news.

So this week, we're turning the show over to our colleagues from the On Our Watch podcast, out of KQED and NPR's Investigations Team. It's about one of these quotidian cases of police brutality — the kind that didn't go viral.

And for more from the On Our Watch team, you can visit their website here.