Name Discrimination Persists In Hiring; World's Fastest Blind Runner : Here & Now Economists sent out 83,000 job applications as part of a study on name discrimination. Applicants with distinctively Black-sounding names were called back 10% fewer times across the board. One of the study's authors talks about the findings. And, David Brown was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease at 15 months old, which led him to lose his vision by the age of 13. But health issues didn't stop Brown from becoming the world's fastest blind runner. He joins us with his sighted guide runner.

Name Discrimination Persists In Hiring; World's Fastest Blind Runner

Name Discrimination Persists In Hiring; World's Fastest Blind Runner

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Economists sent out 83,000 job applications as part of a study on name discrimination. Applicants with distinctively Black-sounding names were called back 10% fewer times across the board. One of the study's authors talks about the findings.

And, David Brown was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease at 15 months old, which led him to lose his vision by the age of 13. But health issues didn't stop Brown from becoming the world's fastest blind runner. He joins us with his sighted guide runner.

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