Afghan Women On What's At Stake For Women In Afghanistan : 1A The Taliban, now in control of the country of Afghanistan, has promised that women will be treated well under its new government.

Advocates working on the ground say those promises are nothing more than a publicity stunt. They point to the women's rights violations under the Taliban, not just when the group was last in power, but also in the past year.

Women living in the Afghan provinces where the Taliban had already taken control have been the victims of targeted beatings and killings.

Though women are largely off the streets, they've been leading protests against the new government, unwilling to sacrifice the massive gains in rights they've earned themselves in the past two decades.

What's at stake for the girls and women of Afghanistan? And what can be done to protect women's rights moving forward?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

1A

Afghan Women On What's At Stake For Women In Afghanistan

Afghan Women On What's At Stake For Women In Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030659810/1030722936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Zoohra, 60, holds photos of her daughter who she said was killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Zoohra, 60, holds photos of her daughter who she said was killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The Taliban, now in control of the country of Afghanistan, has promised that women will be treated well under its new government. At a public appearance last week, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid vowed that women's rights would be honored, within the framework of Islamic law. The extremist militant group says women and girls will still be able to attend school and join the government.

Advocates working on the ground say those promises are nothing more than a publicity stunt. They point to the women's rights violations under the Taliban, not just when the group was last in power, but also in the past year.

Women living in the Afghan provinces where the Taliban had already taken control have been the victims of targeted beatings and killings. They've now been banned countrywide from leaving the house without a male guardian. The price of burqas, which women are required to wear in public under Taliban rule, surged ten-fold as the group's control spread.

Though women are largely off the streets, they've been leading protests against the new government, unwilling to sacrifice the massive gains in rights they've earned themselves in the past two decades.

What's at stake for the girls and women of Afghanistan? And what can be done to protect women's rights moving forward? We talk to a panel of Afghan women for their perspectives.

Mahbouba Seraj, Sahar Halaimzai, Samira Hamidi, and Rina Amiri join us for the conversation.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs online.