Dorothy Parker's Journey Home To New York City Is Finally Over The writer and civil rights supporter died in 1967. Her ashes spent years in a filing cabinet and at NAACP headquarters. Her family this week held a service at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx.

Dorothy Parker's Journey Home To New York City Is Finally Over

Dorothy Parker's Journey Home To New York City Is Finally Over

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The writer and civil rights supporter died in 1967. Her ashes spent years in a filing cabinet and at NAACP headquarters. Her family this week held a service at Woodlawn Cemetery in The Bronx.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Dorothy Parker's journey home to New York City has ended. The writer and civil rights supporter died in 1967, but her ashes spent years in an attorney's filing cabinet at an NAACP headquarters. Now her family has held a memorial service at a cemetery in the Bronx. Her new headstone quotes one of her poems. (Reading) Leave for her a red young rose; go your way and save your pity; she is happy, for she knows that her dust is very pretty.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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