Western Drought And Population Explosion Strain Water Supply : Planet Money : The Indicator from Planet Money An epic drought and population explosion is draining Lake Mead and the Colorado River, which millions rely on. And then there's the lawns. Today on the show, what happens if the water runs dry?

Should The Lawns In Vegas, Stay In Vegas?

Should The Lawns In Vegas, Stay In Vegas?

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images
An aerial image shows homes in Bolder City, right, and Lake Mead on the Colorado River, left, during low water levels due to the western drought on July 20, 2021 from Boulder City, Nevada.
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The Colorado River and Lake Mead are the main water source for millions of people. But explosive population growth and a mega drought in the west are coming together to dry up the water supply.

Today we speak with Kyle Roerink, a water activist and executive director of the Great Basin Water Network, about the biggest water use culprits in the desert. Kyle shares the dramatic steps he'd take to conserve the water if given the chance. First things first? Get rid of the lawns, all of them.

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