The FTC Reportedly Is Looking Into Why McDonald's Ice-Cream Machines Are Often Broken It's well known among connoisseurs of the fast-food giant's frozen desserts that McDonald's ice-cream machines often don't work properly. It can make McFlurries, shakes and other treats unattainable.

The FTC Reportedly Is Looking Into Why McDonald's Ice-Cream Machines Are Often Broken

The FTC Reportedly Is Looking Into Why McDonald's Ice-Cream Machines Are Often Broken

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It's well known among connoisseurs of the fast-food giant's frozen desserts that McDonald's ice-cream machines often don't work properly. It can make McFlurries, shakes and other treats unattainable.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. So many of us have been there, right? You want a McDonald's McFlurry, and the ice cream machine is broken - again. Might make you mad, but you don't want to make a federal case out of it - unless you're the Federal Trade Commission. That's right. The FTC is investigating why those machines are always frozen. It could have something to do with manufacturers, repairs and monopolies. It's enough to give you a brain freeze, so a Blizzard at Dairy Queen might be a safer bet. It's MORNING EDITION.

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