Researcher Finds Recording Of Duck Saying You Bloody Fool A researcher recently found a decades-old recording of an Australian musk duck named Ripper. Carel Ten Cate says the duck is saying what sounds like, "You bloody fool."

Researcher Finds Recording Of Duck Saying You Bloody Fool

Researcher Finds Recording Of Duck Saying You Bloody Fool

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A researcher recently found a decades-old recording of an Australian musk duck named Ripper. Carel Ten Cate says the duck is saying what sounds like, "You bloody fool."

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Unlike parrots, ducks are not known for imitating human sounds. But a researcher recently found a decades-old recording of an Australian musk duck named Ripper who is saying what sounds like, you bloody fool.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

RIPPER: You bloody fool.

CAREL TEN CATE: Vocal learning is a very rare trait in the animal kingdom.

KING: Researcher Carel ten Cate says finding it in a duck is really special. But who made Ripper mad? It's MORNING EDITION.

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