What The Taliban Government Could Mean For Afghan Women : Consider This from NPR This week, women protested in Kabul after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government. One woman who helped organized the protests told NPR "the world should feel" what Afghan women are facing. That woman — and another who was desperately trying to leave the country — spoke to Rachel Martin on Morning Edition. More from their interviews here.

While some women fear the rights they've gained in the last 20 years will disappear, other women — particularly in rural areas — are hopeful for a future with less violence and military conflict. Anand Gopal wrote about them for The New Yorker in a piece called "The Other Afghan Women." He spoke to Mary Louise Kelly.

Special thanks to NPR's Michele Keleman for production help on this episode.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

In A New Afghanistan, Some Women Fear For Their Rights — But Others Are Hopeful

In A New Afghanistan, Some Women Fear For Their Rights — But Others Are Hopeful

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Afghan girls play cricket on school grounds in Kabul in 2010. At the time, Afghanistan was set to select its first national women's cricket team. But a Taliban official now reportedly says women won't be allowed to play it and other sports. Shah Marai/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Shah Marai/AFP via Getty Images

Afghan girls play cricket on school grounds in Kabul in 2010. At the time, Afghanistan was set to select its first national women's cricket team. But a Taliban official now reportedly says women won't be allowed to play it and other sports.

Shah Marai/AFP via Getty Images

This week, women protested in Kabul after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government. One woman who helped organized the protests told NPR "the world should feel" what Afghan women are facing. That woman — and another who was desperately trying to leave the country — spoke to Rachel Martin on Morning Edition. More from their interviews here.

While some women fear the rights they've gained in the last 20 years will disappear, other women — particularly in rural areas — are hopeful for a future with less violence and military conflict. Anand Gopal wrote about them for The New Yorker in a piece called "The Other Afghan Women." He spoke to Mary Louise Kelly.

Special thanks to NPR's Michele Keleman for production help on this episode.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, Ryan Benk, and Matt Ozug. It was edited by Miranda Kennedy, Courtney Dorning, Lee Hale, Brianna Scott, and Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.