Goodbye, Climate Jargon. Hello, Simplicity! : Short Wave People are likely to be confused by common climate change terms like "mitigation" and "carbon neutral," according to a recent study. So how can everyone do a better job talking about climate change so that no one's left confused? NPR climate correspondent Rebecca Hersher tells us the key turns out to be pretty simple.

Read more of Rebecca's reporting on climate jargon: https://n.pr/2XdfYOC
Read the study: https://bit.ly/3Adj8QT

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org — but please, hold the jargon.

Goodbye, Climate Jargon. Hello, Simplicity!

Goodbye, Climate Jargon. Hello, Simplicity!

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A new study finds common climate change terms can be confusing to the public — including phrases describing the transition to cleaner energy sources. Here, a wind turbine operates near a coal-fired power plant in Germany. Patrick Pleul/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Pleul/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

A new study finds common climate change terms can be confusing to the public — including phrases describing the transition to cleaner energy sources. Here, a wind turbine operates near a coal-fired power plant in Germany.

Patrick Pleul/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

People are likely to be confused by climate change terms like "mitigation" and "carbon neutral," according to a recent study. Yet, these terms are ubiquitous in climate research and reports that are meant to be accessible to a general audience. Even we on Short Wave are guilty of using this confusing jargon. In light of all this, NPR climate correspondent Rebecca Hersher asks: How can everyone — scientists, journalists and other science communicators — do a better job talking about climate change so that no one's left confused?

The key might be simple.

Read more of Rebecca's reporting on climate jargon.

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org — but please, hold the jargon.

This episode was edited by Viet Le, produced by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Berly McCoy. Neil Tevault was the audio engineer.