You Have Questions About Texas' Abortion Law. We Have Answers. : 1A A week after the Supreme Court declined to block Texas' new abortion restrictions, the Justice Department sued the state of Texas.

Attorney General Merrick Garland, who announced the lawsuit, says the statute is unconstitutional.

We talk about the new lawsuit — and answer your questions about the most restrictive abortion law in the country.

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1A

You Have Questions About Texas' Abortion Law. We Have Answers.

You Have Questions About Texas' Abortion Law. We Have Answers.

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Protesters hold up signs at a protest outside the Texas state capitol in Austin, Texas. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Protesters hold up signs at a protest outside the Texas state capitol in Austin, Texas.

Sergio Flores/Getty Images

A week after the Supreme Court declined to block Texas' new abortion restrictions, the Justice Department has sued the state of Texas.

Attorney General Merrick Garland, who announced the lawsuit, says the statute is unconstitutional.

The Texas Tribune reports that previous laws aimed at restricting or stopping abortions have been struck down over the years by the Supreme Court. But because this law relies on private citizens filing lawsuits to enforce it, not state officials or law enforcement, there isn't a specific defendant for the court to make an injunction against. That makes it difficult to strike down in court.

David Coale and Mary Ziegler join us to talk about and answer your questions about the law.

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