Thousands Remain Stuck In Afghanistan : Consider This from NPR It has been exactly one month since Kabul fell and the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. With U.S. troops gone from the region and the collapse of the Afghan Armed forces, thousands have been fleeing the country for safety.

One Month After The Fall Of Kabul Thousands Still Wait For Escape

One Month After The Fall Of Kabul Thousands Still Wait For Escape

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A Taliban guard stands on the Afghan side of the Torkham border crossing with Pakistan. People behind wait either to leave Afghanistan or to receive those returning to the country. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A Taliban guard stands on the Afghan side of the Torkham border crossing with Pakistan. People behind wait either to leave Afghanistan or to receive those returning to the country.

Claire Harbage/NPR

It has been exactly one month since Kabul fell and the Taliban took control of Afghanistan.

With U.S. troops out of the country and the collapse of the Afghan government, thousands have been fleeing the country for safety.

But not all Afghans who want out have been able to escape Taliban rule, despite being promised refuge.

Some Afghans are waiting on visas to come to the U.S., but the people who process refugee paperwork and conduct in-person interviews are no longer in Afghanistan. Without full approval, many Afghans are stuck.

NPR's diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen spoke with Mary Louise Kelly about if the U.S. will be able to assist.

Of those who have been able to flee Afghanistan, many have landed in Virginia and were brought to the Dulles Expo Center, just outside of D.C.

NPR's Tom Bowman was given an exclusive tour of a facility by Tressa Rae Finerty, deputy executive director at the State Department.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale. It was edited by Brianna Scott and Fatma Tanis. Additional reporting from Rachel Martin and Morning Edition staff. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.