2 Men Are Charged In 2019 Murder Of Northern Ireland Journalist Lyra McKee McKee was observing anti-police rioting in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, when she was hit by gunfire in April 2019. Among the charges the two men face are murder, possession of a firearm and arson.

2 Men Are Charged In The Murder Of Northern Ireland Journalist Lyra McKee

Two men appeared at Bishop Street Court House in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in connection with the murder of Lyra McKee, a Northern Irish journalist shot dead as she covered rioting in Londonderry in 2019. Cate McCurry/AP hide caption

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Cate McCurry/AP

Two men appeared at Bishop Street Court House in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, in connection with the murder of Lyra McKee, a Northern Irish journalist shot dead as she covered rioting in Londonderry in 2019.

Cate McCurry/AP

LONDON — Two men appeared in court Friday in connection with the murder of Lyra McKee, a Northern Irish journalist shot dead as she covered rioting in Londonderry in 2019.
Gearoid Cavanagh, 33, and Jordan Devine, 21, were charged with murder, possession of a firearm and ammunition, possession of petrol bombs, throwing petrol bombs, arson and riot.
McKee, 29, was observing anti-police rioting in the city, also known as Derry, when she was hit by gunfire in April 2019. The New IRA, a small paramilitary group that opposes Northern Ireland's peace process, said its members shot McKee by accident while firing at police.
Prosecutors said the two defendants are alleged to have been with the gunman who fired the fatal shot. A judge released the two men on bail until their next hearing on Oct. 7.
McKee was an increasingly influential journalist who had written powerfully about growing up gay in Northern Ireland and the struggles of the generation of "cease-fire babies" raised after the 1998 Good Friday peace accord that ended three decades of sectarian violence.
Hundreds of people attended McKee's funeral, including the prime ministers of Britain and Ireland and political leaders from Northern Ireland's Protestant and Catholic communities. Her death helped spur a successful effort to get feuding politicians to revive Northern Ireland's power-sharing government, which had collapsed in 2017.