Moms Start Company To Employ Adults With Autism; Farmers Of Color Await Debt Relief : Here & Now Pat Miller and Pam Kattouf met on the playground years ago and discovered that both of their kids had autism. The two New Jersey mothers later founded Beloved Bath so that their kids and others like them would have employment opportunities. And, farmers of color across the U.S. are still waiting on billions in debt relief from the Department of Agriculture, which allocated the funds back in March. Mekela Panditharatne, an attorney with Earth Justice, explains why the money hasn't been issued and its impact. Correction: In this podcast, we referred to Dr. Joseph Mercola as one of the founders of America's Frontline Doctors. Dr. Mercola is not affiliated with that group. We regret the error.

Moms Start Company To Employ Adults With Autism; Farmers Of Color Await Debt Relief

Moms Start Company To Employ Adults With Autism; Farmers Of Color Await Debt Relief

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Pat Miller and Pam Kattouf met on the playground years ago and discovered that both of their kids had autism. The two New Jersey mothers later founded Beloved Bath so that their kids and others like them would have employment opportunities.

And, farmers of color across the U.S. are still waiting on billions in debt relief from the Department of Agriculture, which allocated the funds back in March. Mekela Panditharatne, an attorney with Earth Justice, explains why the money hasn't been issued and its impact.

Correction: In this podcast, we referred to Dr. Joseph Mercola as one of the founders of America's Frontline Doctors. Dr. Mercola is not affiliated with that group. We regret the error.

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