Haitians Forced Back Home : Consider This from NPR Thousands of Haitan migrants who were camping out under a bridge in a Texas border town seeking to cross the Rio Grande and find refuge in the US are now being forced back to their home country.

Border Crisis: Thousands Of Haitians Flown to Haiti Against Their Will

Border Crisis: Thousands Of Haitians Flown to Haiti Against Their Will

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Thousands of Haitian migrants have been arriving to Del Rio, Texas, to ask for asylum in the U.S., as authorities begin to deported them to back to Haiti. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Thousands of Haitian migrants have been arriving to Del Rio, Texas, to ask for asylum in the U.S., as authorities begin to deported them to back to Haiti.

Rodrigo Abd/AP

Thousands of Haitan migrants who were camping out under a bridge in a Texas border town seeking to cross the Rio Grande and find refuge in the US are now being forced back to their home country.

Some Haitians have fled after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse and the most recent earthquake in the country, but many of the migrants have been living in other countries in Latin America for years.

Scenes from the border drew criticism after a photographer captured images of migrants being whipped by border agents on horseback.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with John Holman at Al-Jazeera and Jacqueline Charles at the Miami-Herald, both reporters who have been on the ground in Del Rio.

Some migrants are being released into the US. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports about how officials are deciding which migrants are being allowed to request asylum.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale with help from Gus Contreras. It was edited by Brianna Scott and Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.