How America Can Reliably Resist Ransomware : 1A The Biden Administration is attempting to curtail an uptick in ransomware attacks on American businesses.

In June, the world's largest meat processing company was hit by a ransomware group and paid $11 million dollars to resume its operations. And in May, the Colonial Pipeline Company was attacked, disrupting gas supplies to the east coast for a week.

And the attacks are becoming more frequent.

So, what can government and business leaders do to combat these attacks? And who's responsible for improving our cybersecurity?

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How America Can Reliably Resist Ransomware

How America Can Reliably Resist Ransomware

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A laptop displays a message after being infected by a ransomware as part of a worldwide cyberattack on in Geldrop. ROB ENGELAAR/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROB ENGELAAR/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

A laptop displays a message after being infected by a ransomware as part of a worldwide cyberattack on in Geldrop.

ROB ENGELAAR/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

The Biden Administration is attempting to curtail an uptick in ransomware attacks on American businesses. Just last week, an Iowa grain co-operative was hit by a cyberattack by hacking group BlackMatter demanding $5.9 million dollars.

In June, the world's largest meat processing company was hit by a ransomware group and paid $11 million dollars to resume its operations. And in May, the Colonial Pipeline Company was attacked, disrupting gas supplies to the east coast for a week.

These attacks are indeed becoming more frequent. According to the Treasury Department, ransomware payments exceeded $400 million last year – more than four times higher than in 2019.

So, what can government and business leaders do to combat these attacks? And who's responsible for improving our cybersecurity?

Dustin Volz, Megan Stifel, Maurice Turner, and Eric Goldstein join us for the conversation.

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