Global Supply Chain Delays: When Will Things Get Better? : Consider This from NPR Retail experts are already warning of delays, shortages, and price hikes this holiday shopping season as the pandemic continues to disrupt global supply chains.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports on the interconnected nature of those chains — and what happens when a single part delays manufacturing by months at a time.

University of Michigan economist Betsey Stevenson explains why labor-related delays and shortages are not going away any time soon.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The Global Supply Chain Is Still A Mess. When Will It Get Better?

The Global Supply Chain Is Still A Mess. When Will It Get Better?

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In an aerial view, shipping containers sit in dock at the Port of Oakland on September 09, 2021 in Oakland, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In an aerial view, shipping containers sit in dock at the Port of Oakland on September 09, 2021 in Oakland, California.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Retail experts are already warning of delays, shortages, and price hikes this holiday shopping season as the pandemic continues to disrupt global supply chains.

NPR's Scott Horsley reports on the interconnected nature of those chains — and what happens when a single part delays manufacturing by months at a time.

University of Michigan economist Betsey Stevenson explains why labor-related delays and shortages are not going away any time soon.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Cortney Dorning and Fatma Tanis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.