Facebook Paused The Development Of Instagram For Kids. Now What? : 1A On Monday, Facebook announced it was pausing the development of Instagram Kids — a service designed for children 13 and under.

The move comes after a Wall Street Journal investigation revealed Facebook's own internal research about how its platforms are negatively impacting the mental health of young users.

On Thursday, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing about the toxic effects of social media on young people.

So who's responsible for ensuring their wellbeing? We put that question to a panel of experts.

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Facebook Paused The Development Of Instagram For Kids. Now What?

Facebook Paused The Development Of Instagram For Kids. Now What?

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When it comes to teens logging on, the horse left the barn a long time ago. So who's responsible for ensuring their wellbeing? OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

When it comes to teens logging on, the horse left the barn a long time ago. So who's responsible for ensuring their wellbeing?

OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

On Monday, Facebook announced it was pausing the development of Instagram Kids — a service designed for children 13 and under.

The move comes after a Wall Street Journal investigation revealed Facebook's own internal research about how its platforms are negatively impacting the mental health of young users.

The Wall Street Journal reported that for the past three years, Facebook conducted studies into how its photo-sharing app affects its millions of young users. According to The Journal, the company's researchers found that Instagram is harmful for a sizable percentage of young users, most notably teenage girls.

On Thursday, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing about the toxic effects of social media on young people.

When it comes to teens logging on, the horse left the barn a long time ago. So who's responsible for ensuring their wellbeing? We put that question to a panel of experts.

Jean Twenge, Jim Steyer, Deepa Seetharaman, and Theresa Olohan join us for this conversation.

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