There was nothing like 'Soul Train' on TV. There's never been anything like it since : Pop Culture Happy Hour When Soul Train was first nationally syndicated in October of 1971, there was nothing else like it on TV. It became an iconic Black music and dance show — a party every weekend that anyone could join from their living room. In this episode of It's Been A Minute With Sam Sanders, we break down the lasting influence of Soul Train on our culture, with Hanif Abdurraqib, author of A Little Devil in America.

There was nothing like 'Soul Train' on TV. There's never been anything like it since

There was nothing like 'Soul Train' on TV. There's never been anything like it since

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Soul Train made its national television premiere 50 years ago, in October 1971. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Soul Train made its national television premiere 50 years ago, in October 1971.

Blake Cale for NPR

When Soul Train was first nationally syndicated in October of 1971, there was nothing else like it on TV. It became an iconic Black music and dance show — a party every weekend that anyone could join from their living room. In this episode of It's Been A Minute With Sam Sanders, we break down the lasting influence of Soul Train on our culture, with Hanif Abdurraqib, author of A Little Devil in America.

This episode was produced by Anjuli Sastry and Liam McBain. It was edited by Jordana Hochman.