150th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire; Journalists win Nobel Peace Prize : Here & Now As the tale goes, Miss O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern and started the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, burning 17,500 buildings and killing around 300 people. Robert Loerzel, a Chicago-based freelance journalist, discusses his reporting of firsthand accounts. And, Maria Ressa, co-founder and CEO of the news website The Rappler in the Philippines, and Dmitry Muratov, founder and editor of the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, have won the Nobel Peace Prize. We learn more about their win with Joel Simon of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

150th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire; Journalists win Nobel Peace Prize

150th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire; Journalists win Nobel Peace Prize

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As the tale goes, Miss O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern and started the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, burning 17,500 buildings and killing around 300 people. Robert Loerzel, a Chicago-based freelance journalist, discusses his reporting of firsthand accounts.

And, Maria Ressa, co-founder and CEO of the news website The Rappler in the Philippines, and Dmitry Muratov, founder and editor of the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, have won the Nobel Peace Prize. We learn more about their win with Joel Simon of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

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