Scientists discover sweet white flower is really a sneaky carnivore Botanists discovered what some insects may have known for a long time: the false asphodel has an appetite for meat. The small hairs on the flower secrete an enzyme that traps and digests flies.

Scientists discover sweet white flower is really a sneaky carnivore

Scientists discover sweet white flower is really a sneaky carnivore

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Botanists discovered what some insects may have known for a long time: the false asphodel has an appetite for meat. The small hairs on the flower secrete an enzyme that traps and digests flies.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Good morning. I'm A Martinez.

Scientists have known about a flower called the false asphodel since the 19th century - a long-stemmed plant with pretty white petals. But closer inspection led botanists to discover what some insects may have known for a long time - that the wildflower has an appetite for meat. The small hairs on the flower secrete an enzyme that traps and digests poor flies that stop by. So to all our fly listeners or listeners who are flies, consider yourself warned.

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