The fish Danny Lee 'Butch' Smith caught resembles a dinosaur The alligator gar is considered a "living fossil." It's been around 100 million years, meaning it existed at the time of the dinosaurs. Smith caught the rare fish in Kansas.

The fish Danny Lee 'Butch' Smith caught resembles a dinosaur

The fish Danny Lee 'Butch' Smith caught resembles a dinosaur

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The alligator gar is considered a "living fossil." It's been around 100 million years, meaning it existed at the time of the dinosaurs. Smith caught the rare fish in Kansas.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The photo of Danny Lee "Butch" Smith shows him holding the fish he caught, and, wow, it stretches from his head down near his ankles, 4 1/2 feet. The alligator gar resembles some kind of dinosaur. It's typically north of the Ohio, but Smith caught his in Kansas, where the fish seems to have migrated. It's considered a living fossil. It's been around 100 million years, meaning it existed at the time of the dinosaurs. It's MORNING EDITION.

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