Former President Bill Clinton expected to leave hospital Sunday His spokesperson says Clinton, who was admitted to a California hospital to receive treatment for a "non-Covid-related infection," will remain there overnight to get IV antibiotics.

Former President Bill Clinton expected to leave hospital Sunday

Former President Bill Clinton speaks during funeral services for Hank Aaron in Atlanta earlier this year. Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves via AP hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves via AP

Former President Bill Clinton speaks during funeral services for Hank Aaron in Atlanta earlier this year.

Kevin D. Liles/Atlanta Braves via AP

Former President Bill Clinton, who has been hospitalized at the University of California Irvine Medical Center for a "non-Covid-related infection," is expected to be discharged on Sunday, his spokesperson said Saturday afternoon.

"President Clinton has continued to make excellent progress over the last 24 hours," Angel Ureña said in a statement released on Twitter.

Clinton will continue to receive IV antibiotics overnight Saturday, Ureña said.

"He is in great spirits and has been spending time with family, catching up with friends, and watching college football. He is deeply grateful for the excellent care he continues to receive and thankful to the many well-wishers who have sent kind words to him and his family. He's looking forward to getting home very soon," Ureña wrote.

Clinton has been at the hospital since Tuesday.

On Friday, President Biden told reporters traveling with him in Connecticut that he had spoken with Clinton, who he said was doing well and would soon be released from the hospital.

"I wanted to see how he was doing. He's doing fine. He really is," Biden said. "He's not in any serious condition," he said, adding that he planned to have lunch with him soon.

A statement released Thursday from Drs. Alpesh Amin and Lisa Bardack said Clinton, who's 75, was admitted "for close monitoring and administered IV antibiotics and fluids. He remains at the hospital for continuous monitoring."

"After two days of treatment, his white blood cell count is trending down and he is responding to antibiotics well. The California-based medical team has been in constant communication with the President's New York-based medical team, including his cardiologist. We hope to have him go home soon."