It's Been A Minute: The Legacy Of 'Soul Train' : Up First When Soul Train was first nationally syndicated in October of 1971, there was nothing else like it on TV. It became an iconic Black music and dance show — a party every weekend that anyone could join from their living room. In the first episode of a three-part It's Been A Minute series examining the concept of crossover in pop music across three decades, Sam Sanders breaks down the lasting influence of Soul Train. With Hanif Abdurraqib, author of A Little Devil in America, as well as scholars, fans and even a few featured dancers, they ask: why has there never been another show like Soul Train since it went off the air?

It's Been A Minute: The Legacy Of 'Soul Train'

It's Been A Minute: The Legacy Of 'Soul Train'

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When Soul Train was first nationally syndicated in October of 1971, there was nothing else like it on TV. It became an iconic Black music and dance show — a party every weekend that anyone could join from their living room. In the first episode of a three-part It's Been A Minute series examining the concept of crossover in pop music across three decades, Sam Sanders breaks down the lasting influence of Soul Train. With Hanif Abdurraqib, author of A Little Devil in America, as well as scholars, fans and even a few featured dancers, they ask: why has there never been another show like Soul Train since it went off the air?