Cases Of Havana Syndrome Grow While Cause Remains A Mystery : Consider This from NPR Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.

The list of symptoms include hearing loud sounds, nausea fatigue, and dizzying migraines, among others.

The cause of this mystery illness is a source of curiosity, but it remains unknown.

Last year the State Department commissioned a study by the National Academies of Sciences for researchers to investigate Havana Syndrome.

NPR's Sarah McCammon spoke to Dr. David Relman, a Stanford professor who headed the investigation.

One possible cause their group came to was a form of microwave radiation that occurs in a pulsed or intermittent form.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

Havana Syndrome: Over 200 Cases Documented Yet Cause Remains A Mystery

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Mitchell Joseph Valdes Sosa, the director of the Cuban Neurosciences Center, gives a press conference about symptoms reported by U.S. and Canadian diplomats in 2016 and 2017, commonly referred to as the "Havana Syndrome," in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Mitchell Joseph Valdes Sosa, the director of the Cuban Neurosciences Center, gives a press conference about symptoms reported by U.S. and Canadian diplomats in 2016 and 2017, commonly referred to as the "Havana Syndrome," in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021.

Ramon Espinosa/AP

Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.

The list of symptoms include hearing loud sounds, nausea fatigue, and dizzying migraines, among others.

The cause of this mystery illness is a source of curiosity, but it remains unknown.

Last year the State Department commissioned a study by the National Academies of Sciences for researchers to investigate Havana Syndrome.

NPR's Sarah McCammon spoke to Dr. David Relman, a Stanford professor who headed the investigation.

One possible cause their group came to was a form of microwave radiation that occurs in a pulsed or intermittent form.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Jonaki Mehta and Brianna Scott. It was edited by Courtney Dorning, Brent Baughman, Fatma Tanis, Lee Hale and Matthew Ozug with help from Greg Myre and Scott Hensley. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.