Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion' : Alt.Latino This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

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Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000. Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000.

Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

This so-called explosion brought artists like Ricky Martin, Jennifer Lopez, Marc Anthony, and Shakira to new heights as artists in the American pop music scene. But for whom was that boom in Latino artists? And what were the business considerations behind it?

It's Been a Minute interrogates all of these questions and more as it uncovers the true roots of this "Latin Explosion" and its long-term implications for Latino artists in the music industry.