Food connects books by novelist Cecily Wong and musician Michelle Zauner : NPR's Book of the Day Our relationship to food goes far beyond its nutritional value. What we eat can help us tap into something deeper, whether it brings up treasured memories or allows us to escape our own lives for just a few bites. That duality is captured by two different books in today's episode; while Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner explores how cooking Korean food helped the author grieve her mom's death, Gastro Obscura by Cecily Wong and Dylan Thuras takes readers to each continent to learn about its cuisine. In interviews with NPR's Ari Shapiro, Zauner and Wong talk about how food shapes our worlds.

Food is a gateway to the new and familiar in 'Crying in H Mart' and 'Gastro Obscura'

Food is a gateway to the new and familiar in 'Crying in H Mart' and 'Gastro Obscura'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047602583/1047675770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Our relationship to food goes far beyond its nutritional value. What we eat can help us tap into something deeper, whether it brings up treasured memories or allows us to escape our own lives for just a few bites. That duality is captured by two different books in today's episode; while Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner explores how cooking Korean food helped the author grieve her mom's death, Gastro Obscura by Cecily Wong and Dylan Thuras takes readers to each continent to learn about its cuisine. In interviews with NPR's Ari Shapiro, Zauner and Wong talk about how food shapes our worlds.

Knopf; Workman Publishing Company
the covers of CRYING IN HMART and Gastro Obscura
Knopf; Workman Publishing Company