The Great Resignation : Consider This from NPR A record 4.3 million workers in America quit their jobs in August.

Anthony Klotz coined this ongoing phenomenon "The Great Resignation."

Klotz is an organizational psychologist at Texas A&M University.

In part, he says, the pandemic has made workers reevaluate what they are actually getting out of their jobs.

"During the pandemic, because there was a lot of death and illness and lockdowns, we really had the time and the motivation to sit back and say, do I like the trajectory of my life? Am I pursuing a life that brings me well-being?" Klotz said.

Employers are also having to rethink what their employees really need.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with Laszlo Bock, co-founder and CEO of the human resources company Humu, about the basic human need for respect.

"You know, in the pandemic, people have talked a lot about essential workers, but we actually treat them as essential jobs," said Bock. "We treat the workers as quite replaceable."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

The Great Resignation: Why People Are Leaving Their Jobs In Growing Numbers

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A 'Help Wanted' sign is posted beside Coronavirus safety guidelines in front of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

A 'Help Wanted' sign is posted beside Coronavirus safety guidelines in front of a restaurant in Los Angeles, California on May 28, 2021.

Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

A record 4.3 million workers in America quit their jobs in August.

Anthony Klotz coined this ongoing phenomenon "The Great Resignation."

Klotz is an organizational psychologist at Texas A&M University.

In part, he says, the pandemic has made workers reevaluate what they are actually getting out of their jobs.

"During the pandemic, because there was a lot of death and illness and lockdowns, we really had the time and the motivation to sit back and say, do I like the trajectory of my life? Am I pursuing a life that brings me well-being?" Klotz said.

Employers are also having to rethink what their employees really need.

NPR's Audie Cornish spoke with Laszlo Bock, co-founder and CEO of the human resources company Humu, about the basic human need for respect.

"You know, in the pandemic, people have talked a lot about essential workers, but we actually treat them as essential jobs," said Bock. "We treat the workers as quite replaceable."

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Jonaki Mehta and Brianna Scott. It was edited by Christopher Intagliata, Brent Baughman, Matt Ozug, and Fatma Tanis with help from Scott Horsley. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.