Japanese airline uses vending machines to sell mystery flights There's a catch: Domestic travelers don't get to choose where they go — the routes are random. They include cities like Okinawa and Sapporo. More than 3,000 flights have been sold since August.

Japanese airline uses vending machines to sell mystery flights

Japanese airline uses vending machines to sell mystery flights

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There's a catch: Domestic travelers don't get to choose where they go — the routes are random. They include cities like Okinawa and Sapporo. More than 3,000 flights have been sold since August.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Good morning. I'm A Martinez.

Think about all the things you can buy from a vending machine - chips, soda. What about flights? A Japanese airline is using vending machines to sell domestic flights, destination unknown. Yeah, that's right. Travelers don't get to choose where they go. The routes are random. They include cities like Okinawa and Sapporo. The company thought they'd only sell a mystery flight a day. More than 3,000 have been sold since August.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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