Researchers study London cab drivers' brains to learn more about Alzheimer's To get licensed, cabbies have to memorize thousands of streets and know how to get to them without a GPS. MRI scans show that the part of the brain that handles memory has grown in London cab drivers.

Researchers study London cab drivers' brains to learn more about Alzheimer's

Researchers study London cab drivers' brains to learn more about Alzheimer's

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To get licensed, cabbies have to memorize thousands of streets and know how to get to them without a GPS. MRI scans show that the part of the brain that handles memory has grown in London cab drivers.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Researchers are studying the brains of London cab drivers to learn more about Alzheimer's, The Washington Post reports. To get licensed there, cabbies have to memorize thousands of streets and know how to get to them without a GPS or maps. MRI scans show that the part of the brain that handles memory has actually grown in London cab drivers. It's the same part that shrinks in Alzheimer's patients. It's MORNING EDITION.

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