Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients : Short Wave Aduhelm, known generically as aducanumab, is the first drug to actually affect the underlying disease process associated with Alzheimer's. Yet sales have been limited, and the drug is reaching very few patients — at least so far. It's expensive, risky and likely doing little to improve patients' lives. NPR science correspondent Jon Hamilton explains why doctors and patients aren't excited about the new drug and what it could mean for future Alzheimer's drugs.

Additional links:
- Jon's reporting on aducanumab: https://n.pr/3bDV0MY
- Jon's reporting on future Alzheimer's treatments: https://n.pr/3bDUsqo

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

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Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June. Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Universal Images Group via Getty

Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June.

Universal Images Group via Getty

Aduhelm, known generically as aducanumab, is the first drug to actually affect the underlying disease process associated with Alzheimer's. Yet sales have been limited, and the drug is reaching very few patients — at least so far. It's expensive, risky and likely doing little to improve patients' lives. NPR science correspondent Jon Hamilton explains why doctors and patients aren't excited about the new drug and what it could mean for future Alzheimer's drugs.

Additional links:

You can always reach the show by emailing shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was edited by Sara Sarasohn, produced by Rebecca Ramirez and fact-checked by Margaret Cirino. Neil Tevault was the audio engineer.