Grief: What happens in our brains when we process loss : Short Wave When we lose someone or something we love, it can feel like we've lost a part of ourselves. And for good reason--our brains are learning how to live in the world without someone we care about in it. Host Emily Kwong talks with psychologist Mary-Frances O'Connor about the process our brains go through when we experience grief. Her book, The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How We Learn from Love and Loss, publishes February 1, 2022.

What happens in the brain when we grieve

What happens in the brain when we grieve

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When we lose someone or something we love, it can feel like we've lost a part of ourselves. And for good reason—our brains are learning how to live in the world without someone we care about in it. Host Emily Kwong talks with psychologist Mary-Frances O'Connor about the process our brains go through when we experience grief. Her book, The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How We Learn from Love and Loss, publishes February 1, 2022.

Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop
Dark gray silhouette of a person's head and shoulders from a side angle in front of an olive green background. A raining cloud is inside of the person's head.
Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy, edited by Gisele Grayson and fact checked by Margaret Cirino. The audio engineers were Josh Newell and Rene Pringle.